Newism: Building the Latest Trends into Your Content


What is NEWISM?  The lure and the appeal of what is new is… well… nothing new.  As humans we are drawn to stock in retail spaces that are in pristine condition and we all breathe in hard our new car smell, but at a more strategic level, in our current short-attention span world, the drive to embrace the ‘new’ has never been so powerful.

According to a new report by TrendWatching.com, NEWism, the latest ‘ism’, is: “is creative destruction, hyper-competition, globalism, consumerism on steroids and a celebration of innovation, all in one.”  They argue that for B2C brands it means capturing and holding consumers’ attention, and although the attention span of consumers is shorter than ever, this creates opportunities for short, sharp bursts of innovation that can pay off.  Big.

Within NEWism itself, there are several observable trends, including: creative/destruction; FSTR (faster); experience cramming; status stream; trysumers and To Have is to (H)old.  Let’s look at these one at a time…

1. CREATIVE > DESTRUCTION

Given more flexible market structures, new products, services and experiences on a daily, if not hourly basis, in every B2C industry, creating a plethora of opportunities for consumers.  If proof were needed of this trend in action, note that the World Intellectual Property Organisation has observed that 2 million patents were applied for in 2010, up from 1.4 million in 2000.

2. FSTR

Everything is getting faster and FSTR, if you will.  The delivery of ease and speed as a market edge has never been stronger – witness the success of Instagram (10 million users in under a year) or Draw Something (35 million users in just 6 weeks!).  The downside is that products can go from ‘hot’ to ‘not’ at just as quickly.

3. EXPERIENCE CRAMMING

The desire to tell interesting STATUS STORIES is further fuelling consumers’ never-ending lust for new experiences, especially acute in a world where so much of identity is expressed online.  Just by posting about the latest trend on social media, from a trusted referrer or source, is enough to create sufficient curiosity to drive increased traffic for a new concept/product/service.

4. STATUS STREAM

As everything is increasingly transient, keeping one’s finger firmly on the pulse of the endless global torrent of new products and services, showing one’s connectedness and being in the know, will be an ever-richer source of social status (especially for SOCIAL-LITE consumers).  Something can never be too ‘new’, apparently and knowledge of the new is increasingly valuable and is the currency of our age.

5. TRYSUMERS

Our new consumer environment is increasingly transparent, with everything now reviewed and rated the moment it’s created, meaning the risk for consumers of trying out something new is approaching zero.  Trysumers are modern-day market testers, working in real time, enabling consumers to experience the ‘new’ with less commitment, and at lower cost.

6. TO HAVE IS TO (H)OLD

New consumers are embracing the trend of devolving themselves of ‘stuff’.  These days consumers rent and/or share everything (from cars to clothes to electronics), get perpetual upgrades and are always a click away from the ‘next’.  Using brand buy-backs, exchange schemes, online platforms and mobile marketplaces, it is smart to offer convenient options for consumers keen to ‘trade in to trade up’ to the new.

Paradoxically, while new has never been so hot in consumer trends, there has been a simultaneous push towards the glorification of all things retro – hence more products than ever are packaged in tins, and the resurgence of such brands as Vita-Mix, KitchenAid and the market appeal of all things ‘vintage’. Even the ‘old’ manufactured to be ‘new-ish’ looking.

So how do we make sense of this lust for both the new and the old simultaneously?  While innovation is valued more than ever, balance this with the idea that ‘heritage’ brands, known to deliver constant, trusted quality and provenance potentially have market appeal that eclipses what is right ‘now’.  In a strange way, the lust for the new also reinforces the power of the tried and true.

So what’s the take-away here?  If brands can harness the drive to innovate and share, and wrap it in the trusted values of the past, there is a winning formula here for increased market penetration across a broad range of industries.


Yours in PR

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